Our Breasts

This blog is by people with breasts, for people with breasts. This blog is inclusive of all people with breasts, regardless of gender. It celebrates the beautiful diversity of breasts, of all sizes, shapes, colours, ages and races. Breasts are such an important and integral part of what makes us feel beautiful and sexual. By showing how all breasts are different, and uniquely special, we will be able to challenge the beliefs around what makes breasts beautiful. There is no single standard for breast beauty! By sharing photos we are demonstrating how every breast is different, and in turn, we will be able to help people with breasts feel better about themselves, improve self-esteem, and show that yes, you are normal.


NOTE: This blog shows photos depicting nudity in a non-sexual setting, and contains written content with adult themes. Photo submissions showing nudity are to be from people 18+ only.


Visit My Other Body-Positive Blogs
Large Labia Project
Real Women's Bodies







Email Submission: I am 22 years old and wear a 32 B bra. I’ve always been very insecure about my breasts because I think they are too small (and have friends who have made fun of my chest size) but lately I’ve been trying to embrace them. The fact that they are healthy is more important to me than them being bigger. I wanted to submit my photos to this blog because even though I am self conscious I am trying to find the beauty in my breasts and am trying to learn to love them.

Q. I just realized I have inverted nipples. Please tell me things that will make me feel better.

A. Around 10% to 20% of people with breasts have inverted nipples so it’s quite common. Some people feel self-conscious about them, but then again lots of people are self-conscious about their everted (outie) nipples too.There’s nothing to be concerned about.


Q. Are inverted nipples always inverted or do they pop out when stimulated?

A. It depends on how inverted they are. Some will pop out with erection from the cold or sexual arousal, and otherwise can be forced out with your fingers to varying degrees. There are three “grades” the medical community uses to describe the amount of inversion:

Grade 1: These are often called shy nipples. Inverted nipple is easily pulled out, maintains its projection fairly well without traction. Gentle finger pressure around the areola or gently pinching the skin causes the nipple to pop back out.

Grade 2: The inverted nipple can be pulled out, but not as easily as in Grade 1. After releasing traction, the nipple tends to fall back and invert again. Most inverted nipple fall into this grade.

Grade 3: The nipple is very inverted and it’s difficult to pull out these nipples manually. Once released the nipple quickly retracts.


Q. Can I breastfeed a child if I have inverted nipples?

A. Yes, but it may be more difficult than for those people who don’t have inverted nipples, and depending on which grade of inversion you have. Babies don’t nipple feed; they attach to the areolae, so whether the nipple is inverted or everted is largely irrelevant. What matters is how well the milk ducts are functioning and that can vary from nipple to nipple. Grade 3 nipple inversion can be more problematic.

If you’ve followed my blog for a while you’ll know that I’m doing surveys into breast size/appearance/feelings/opinions as well as labia. Well the response to the breast survey has been terrific, and I’ll have be able to report some meaningful results from the responses so far.

But, the response to my labia survey has actually been pretty pathetic. I’m not promoting it on the Large Labia Project because I don’t want to skew the results. So I’m relying on visitors here to drop their undies and give me half an hour of their time to help get a comprehensive understanding of what everyday vulva are like.

Chances are that if you have breasts then you have labia too, so I need you to be part of this. No excuses!

Please, please, please, help me out by taking my survey. I really don’t mind begging and sounding pathetic for a good cause :)

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/LabiaSurvey2014

Please also help spread the word about this. If you have your own blog, please tell your readers/followers and reblog. If you have Facebook or Twitter or other social media, please let your friends and followers there know too. If you have friends who have a vulva, tell them about it. If you have sisters, girlfriends, wives, mothers - tell them too. I need as many people to do this as possible, of all ages, races and appearances.

I’m going to be winding this survey up soon, so if you’re able to give me 30 minutes of your time, then please do it soon. Ultimately it’s going to help us all, by showing how normal we all are.

Thanks for your help.

Emma

PS: If you tried to do it before and you had problems, well I’ve fixed them all and you can take the survey 100% problem-free. Just tell me in the comments that this is a do-over.

Anonymous Submission: Hi. I am 22 years old, and I recently lost a lot of weight in both muscle and fat, so my breasts sag. It’s kind of cute. I have never had a child and my bra size is 70F(EUR) or 32F/32E (US/UK). I used to wish for large breasts when I was younger, but now I find that they’re often in the way or a bit too heavy when walking around in town. on the plus side, they’re cuddly! they are roughly the same size, but quite far apart.
I have started to lose feeling in them recently (which is partly why I am uploading this picture) and am getting them checked out tomorrow. I guess this is some sort of make-your-own-good-luck-charm! now they’re on the internet, they HAVE to be okay!
Love this blog!
Thanks for contributing your beautiful breasts to this project, and for sharing your story. I hope everything goes well with your visit to the doctor, and I know that you’ll have thousands of people wishing you well.
Emma

Anonymous Submission: Hi. I am 22 years old, and I recently lost a lot of weight in both muscle and fat, so my breasts sag. It’s kind of cute. I have never had a child and my bra size is 70F(EUR) or 32F/32E (US/UK). I used to wish for large breasts when I was younger, but now I find that they’re often in the way or a bit too heavy when walking around in town. on the plus side, they’re cuddly! they are roughly the same size, but quite far apart.

I have started to lose feeling in them recently (which is partly why I am uploading this picture) and am getting them checked out tomorrow. I guess this is some sort of make-your-own-good-luck-charm! now they’re on the internet, they HAVE to be okay!

Love this blog!


Thanks for contributing your beautiful breasts to this project, and for sharing your story. I hope everything goes well with your visit to the doctor, and I know that you’ll have thousands of people wishing you well.

Emma

I’m very content with my breasts and body, and find the female body to be so incredibly beautiful. I have a very sacred relationship with my vulva, but I don’t know whether to be proud of or ashamed of my breasts, since they’re so objectified. I think their purpose is so beautiful, but my relation to them is hindered by the act that breasts are so often used to objectify women. advice? :(


Why do your feelings about your own body have anything to do with other people’s thoughts or feelings about anatomy? Why would you feel ashamed? Have you done anything wrong? Is it your fault that other people objectify and sexualise breasts? Are you responsible for their attitudes and behaviour?

Breasts are not sex organs. Their primary purpose is to nurse babies. They do have secondary sex characteristics which play a definite role in attraction. Whether other people (the guy next door or on the street, advertisers, marketers, the media, entertainment industry, cosmetic surgeons, and the people with breasts who are sucked into that thinking too) have a skewed understanding of them, objectify and fetishize them is something we all feel the effects of, but is not our responsibility.

Whether you feel proud of them is entirely up to you, and you shouldn’t feel hindered by other people’s irrelevant opinions (including mine lol). Make up your own mind, and let other people be damned. But for heaven’s sake, never feel ashamed of your normal body.

Emma

Asker Anonymous Asks:
What if it hurts when I have little or a lot of hair on my labia? Usually I feel so much comfortable with no hair And way more discomfort with hair.
ourbreasts ourbreasts Said:

Oh that’s easy - do whatever makes you feel more comfortable. If that means shaving or waxing off the pubic hair on your labia majora, then do it.

I conducted a recent survey to see whether having or removing pubic hair had an impact on the pain and discomfort some people have with their labia minora, especially protruding labia minora.

While each person’s experience will be unique, based on their anatomy, skin sensitivity, and their wardrobe, the results show that if you shave or wax your labia majora you will be more likely to experience pain, chafing, irritation, pulling and discomfort with your labia minora.

If your labia hurt, my advice is don’t shave!

Emma

Asker Anonymous Asks:
So I was hoping for some advice :/ both of my nipples seem to have crusty yellow/white bits in the middle. why could that be? I wash them and when I pick out the bits my nipples bleed. They look gross and I duno what to do
ourbreasts ourbreasts Said:

I’m assuming you’re not nursing at the moment. Crusty stuff on your nipples is dried discharge. Mostly nipple discharge is normal and isn’t anything to worry about, especially if it’s happening with both nipples. 

It could be caused by a number of things, including an infection, cysts in the breasts, non-cancerous tumors, as well as certain medications, consuming high amounts of caffeine, smoking and hormone therapy.

Discharge, especially if it’s bloody or brown (from dried blood), can be a sign of a serious condition though.

For now don’t pick at it, especially if it makes your nipples bleed, and wash your nipples in the shower. And if you’re not breastfeeding or pregnant, then you probably should see your doctor for a proper diagnosis.

Emma

 

Anonymous Submission: Hi Emma, I’ve submitted before and it was very helpful for me. I really love this blog because it makes me realize so many people have breasts like I do and they’re beautiful. I can’t tell you how happy I get when I see images of people with breasts that are similar to mine. It allows me to take a deep breath and know that there is nothing wrong with the way my body looks; I don’t have to be ashamed. Whenever I show sexual partners my breasts I get so embarrassed and want to push them up or leave them in a bra. I don’t feel comfortable with the way my breasts look if they’re not being held up. I’m trying to be more open with the way they naturally hang. I wanted to submit again because I’m having a lot of difficulties loving my body right now. I’m hoping that encouraging others will allow me to love myself more. Thank you for everything you do with this site and its sister blog.

Anonymous Submission: Hi Emma, I’ve submitted before and it was very helpful for me. I really love this blog because it makes me realize so many people have breasts like I do and they’re beautiful. I can’t tell you how happy I get when I see images of people with breasts that are similar to mine. It allows me to take a deep breath and know that there is nothing wrong with the way my body looks; I don’t have to be ashamed. Whenever I show sexual partners my breasts I get so embarrassed and want to push them up or leave them in a bra. I don’t feel comfortable with the way my breasts look if they’re not being held up. I’m trying to be more open with the way they naturally hang. I wanted to submit again because I’m having a lot of difficulties loving my body right now. I’m hoping that encouraging others will allow me to love myself more. Thank you for everything you do with this site and its sister blog.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Hi Emma, I saw the post about your statistics about inverted nipples and the example of redheads... well I'm a redhead with inverted nipples so I guess that makes me extra unique :) I learned to love them because on the bright side, you never have to worry about your nipples sticking out in a bathing suit or other thin top!
ourbreasts ourbreasts Said:

Haha you’re a rare gem then! How awesome, and what a wonderful combination :) Well not that there’s anything wrong with having the outline of nipples visible through clothing or swimwear, but I accept your point.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
If men are invited to comment on women's bodies, women will always equate their value to whether a guy will find them attractive or not. It would also up the sense of entitlement men have that leads them to comment on women they don't know. I'd also be concerned that there'd be a flux of male comments published after each submission that would turn the blog into a porn/glamour style rating page - even if the comments are positive, this type of thing remains degrading.
ourbreasts ourbreasts Said:

Men aren’t being invited to comment on women’s bodies. Actually the way I was proposing it wouldn’t allow that to happen. Any comments received would be:

(a) vetted and moderated by me,

(b) would not be specific to any one post, person or contributor, rather would be general feedback and words of support, and

(c) as I originally said, would follow the approach taken on the Male Comments page on Large Labia Project, where comments are posted on a separate page away from people’s timelines / dashboards.

Comments on individual posts are permanently disabled so there won’t be any “rating” going on. People are free to “like” though. Unfortunately reblogging is an intrinsic feature of Tumblr which I can’t turn off, but people leaving unsavoury comments when reblogging end up blocked. But that’s not the issue.

I’m talking about cis guys sending me submissions or “asking questions” with messages of support. Only those would be published.

As for any sense of entitlement, well you may be onto something there. But while I believe that in an ideal world we don’t need to rely on the opinion of someone else, of any gender, for personal validation, the everyday reality for many people is that they feel they need it. The number of times I’m asked by insecure people whether their boyfriends will like “this”, or whether some guy they like would prefer “that”, leads me to believe a more practical approach will be helpful, alongside the idealistic message that it’s best to just be yourself without the need to please anyone else.

Many people come to this site to ask “am I normal?” and all I can offer is empirical facts (where available) and my opinion. Who’s to say that my opinion is better than anyone else’s? (other than me of course lol). My view of feminism is not anti-male. It’s just a desire to not be treated like shit. Having someone of any gender take the time to say “hey, you’re ok” is pretty worthwhile in my book.

Emma

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Hey Emma I have inverted nipples and I absolutely hate them I can honestly say that my breast are the ONLY part of my body that I hate. When ever I make out with someone and they go for my breast I move away or just stop talking to them all together. The only people that know about them or have seen them are my parents and my best friend, and although they don't think they are a problem I do. I don't want to spend the rest of my life avoiding intimacy because I'm self conscious about my breast.
ourbreasts ourbreasts Said:

Hi, well I guess it’s something that you’re going to have to learn to live. They are your breasts and you’ve got them for life, so it’s a good idea to try to make peace with them. A way to start is to establish exactly why you have such a problem with them, not just “I don’t like them” but really delve into why. Then ask yourself where those those feelings or thoughts came from, and whether they are fair (to you), based on rational thinking, and have any validity at all. You might find that thinking objectively about it can help to change how you feel.

How do you feel about other people’s inverted nipples? Is it any different to how you feel about yourself?

FYI around 10% of people have inverted nipples, and upwards of 50% have flat or shy nipples. Compare that to people who have red hair, which is around 2% of the human population, and you can start to put it into perspective.

Here are the posts that ave been tagged with “inverted nipples" and some of my thoughts on the subject. And for those who think they are unattractive I always come back to thinking about Dutch supermodel Lara Stone, who is gorgeous, successful, and unashamedly has inverted nipples. 

Emma

Yes, poor little old you. There we were, discussing rape, violence against women, systemic oppression and other manifestations of sexism, and you had to jump in to remind us that “not all men” do these things. Why don’t you really say what you want to say? “I HAVE NEVER RAPED/HIT/ASSAULTED A WOMAN!” Right? Isn’t this what you really want to say? Yes, make a discussion that is about the plight of MILLIONS of women about poor little old you. I mean, millions of women are being assaulted and oppressed, but you’ve never done it, so why are we making you uncomfortable with these discussions?
Brenda Wambui breaking down the ridiculous “Not all men!” phrase over at Medium. Top-notch work. (via itmac)

(via sorayachemaly)

Asker Anonymous Asks:
I love the way you moderate the Large Labia Project comments from men. To be honest I was really hoping this would be an option on this blog. It's one of the first things I looked for when I found this sister blog. I trust that the way you run this blog will not be changed in any degrading way and support this move, if it doesn't fall through
ourbreasts ourbreasts Said:

sorayachemaly:

(TW) Why Rape Myths and Euphemisms are Dangerous

Last week, an Englishman was sentenced to five years in jail for raping a woman while she slept. As the judge put it, “She was a pretty girl who you fancied. You simply could not resist. You had sex with her.” He went on to assure the man, “I do not regard you as a classic rapist.”

The good old “classic rapist,” such a comfort to ignorant judges, untold numbers of campus administrators,  and polite society everywhere. Also particularly useful to predatory rapists who continue to act with impunity in the face of myth-making judges.  This kind of language enables future rapes and makes us complicit. Its use should disqualify jurists, who, at the very least should be trained in facts before being allowed to sit on benches.

The “classic rapist” is a popular rape myth, like many others involving dark alleys, dark men, bad women, good women, light women, violence, and more. The “classic rapist” is a blunt force example that is easily disproved, since we know in the vast majority of reported rapes the parties know one another—73% are “non-strangers” and 38% are friends or acquaintances.

Most of the time, however, the delivery is more subtle and euphemistic. Consider…

“Had his way with her”
“Forced himself on her”
“Inappropriate behavior”
“Offensive behavior”
“Indecent assault”
“Carnal knowledge”
“Domestic dispute”
“Family matter”
Defiled her
Sexual misconduct
Unpleasantness
And, my all time personal favorite: “took liberties.”

Sadly, this judge is not alone. His language and ideas are those of our traditions and popular culture, including the media—the place where words most shape our perceptions and understanding of the world. In the media, there are so many common phrases that convey the everyday sexism of trivializing and hiding rape.

“Bad sexual etiquette”
Forced to perform oral sex
“A circumstance”
“The subject matter
Bad hookup
“A crime of personal injury
“Assaulted while unconscious”
Inappropriate behavior
“Sexual impropriety”
“Sex allegations”
“Child bride”
Forced to marry
Sex with a child”
Sexual activity deemed…to have lacked consent
Forced her to engage in sex acts
Seduced the child
The child “seduced him
Taken advantage of
Incestuous relationship
Toddler sex case
Theft of services
“Sex Scandal”

"Toddler Sex Case"? Who thinks that writing "Toddler" and "Sex Case" makes any sense at all, ever?

All of this happens in an environment where rape is used as a metaphor, is a trending joke theme, and where a judge canban the use of word “rape” (or “sexual assault”) in a rape trial.

In an effort to end rape doublespeak the founders of the website Ending Victimization and Blame (EVB) analyze media to explain how language like this, which, as they put it, succinctly “panders to the belief that men are unable to control themselves.” It is, as Melissa McEwan has also so assiduously detailed for years, all part of the weave and weft of institutionalized rape culture.Consent, a recent and revolutionary idea, is a bitter pill for some people, apparently also in courtrooms.

Courtrooms are where we’d like to think rape myths and sloppy, unhelpful language go to die, but that’s frequently not the case. Instead, in courtrooms, or on college campus adjudication boards, survivors frequently feel instead that they are revictimized or the ones being investigated.

There’s a high chance that my inbox will be populated by “stop word policing” messages as a result of this piece. l’ll stop talking about reality-shaping words when clearing through our national backlog of more than 400,000 rape kits is a priority for society and the annual tally of rape doesn’t result in the undercounting of more than one million rapes. Changing words to #Endrapedoublespeak is a good way to start.

See entire piece at Role Reboot